Month in review: January 2020

Is it just me, or did this January seem to stretch on for an eternity? It wasn’t a particularly eventful month for me, and the interesting things that did happen in my life were…not great. It was a good month of reading, though, and that’s what this post is about!

Books read:

Books in progress/goals for February:

I’m currently reading Mobituaries by Mo Rocca. The book is a tribute to influential people who didn’t get the obituary they deserved, or whose accomplishments and legacy seem to have been forgotten. I’m really enjoying this book so far, and will have a review up sometime next week.

In February, I plan to read at least these three books: Lot by Bryan Washington, Conversations with Friends by Sally Rooney, and Catch and Kill by Ronan Farrow.

Year of Yeh project:

This year, I’ve been posting about my goal to cook every recipe in Molly Yeh’s cookbook Molly on the Range. In January, I made five recipes from the cookbook. If I continue at this pace, I will end up making about 75% of the recipes in the cookbook (which I would definitely be happy with). The recipes I’ve made so far are: spaghetti & meatless balls, plain challah, scallion pancakes with carrot slaw, tahini blondies, and goulash with bread dumplings (pictured below in that order).

Notable blog posts:

I read so many wonderful blog posts and did a better-than-average (my personal average, that is) job of engaging with other bloggers this January. But I forgot to save my list of notable blog posts! I will remember to keep track of them in February.

Quotes/advice that helped me this month:

  • “There will always be someone who can’t see your worth. Don’t let it be you.” (this was posted on Vee’s blog, Millennial Life Crisis)
  • “Empathy without boundaries is self-destruction.” – unknown
  • “All my life had been muck and depths, but I was not a part of that dark water. I was a creature within it.” – Madeline Miller, Circe

January photo dump:

Book Review: Girl, Woman, Other

The book: Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo
Genre: Contemporary fiction
Rating: 5 stars out of 5

Earlier this week, I finished Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo. This book of short stories – each from the perspective of a different black woman living in modern-day Britain – encompasses what it is like to live in post-Brexit Britain.

Girl, Woman, Other did an outstanding job of portraying many unique perspectives on modern-day Britain. Each character’s chapter reveals how their particular life experiences have shaped their perceptions of today’s world. As women (or non-binary people) of color who immigrated to Britain (or are recent descendants of immigrants), the characters have all experienced their fair share of struggle, and the book consistently addresses the issues that have affected them. Amazingly, author Bernardine Evaristo weaves these issues into the story in a very sincere and organic way – it never feels like the commentary on sexism, racism, xenophobia, or homophobia is forced or out-of-place.

To dig a bit deeper than that, I really appreciated how this book shows multiple perspectives on what it means to be a black woman in today’s world. So often, people of color are expected to be a “spokesperson” for their entire race. By featuring twelve women of color with very different life experiences, Evaristo refutes the idea that there is just one definition of what it means to be a person of color in today’s world.

I also found this book to be overwhelmingly positive, which was refreshing. While, yes, all the characters in this book have faced major obstacles in their lives, so many of the characters overcome those obstacles and achieve wonderful things. Amma, after years of being rejected by mainstream theatre companies, makes her way into the establishment and becomes wildly successful. Bummi, despite being orphaned as a child and then losing her husband at a young age, finally ends up living the peaceful life she has always dreamed of. I absolutely loved that this book balances great struggle with great triumph.

Finally, I loved the way this book was structured. There are no capital letters at the beginning of sentences, oftentimes no punctuation where there traditionally would be, and interesting line breaks in the middle of sentences. This made the book feel slower, gentle, and poetic – even when the events described in the book were quite dramatic (or traumatic). It also made sentences and stories flow in a way that felt very natural, making the book hard to put down.

Girl, Woman, Other was incredibly ambitious in the stories it set out to tell – and (in my opinion) it was wildly successful. This book is bold and sharp, but also poetic and beautiful. It is also incredibly astute, hitting the nail on the head with regard to pertinent issues in today’s world. I whole-heartedly recommend this book, and hope to see it on the Women’s Prize for Fiction longlist.