Year of Yeh #3: Scallion Pancakes (and carrot slaw)

This week I continued my “Year of Yeh” project with a versatile recipe that works as a breakfast, lunch, dinner, appetizer, side, or snack: scallion pancakes! The Molly on the Range cookbook lumps the scallion pancakes with a maple syrup carrot slaw, so I did the same.

The recipe: Scallion Pancakes with Maple Syrup Slaw
Difficulty: Moderate
Time: 1.5 hrs

This recipe was time-consuming, but lots of fun. The carrot slaw that accompanies the pancakes is straightforward: just shred carrots and combine them with the other slaw ingredients (vinegar, maple syrup, and ginger). The pancakes are a bit more challenging.

Fresh scallion pancakes.

First, I found it tough to get the pancake dough to the right consistency. To get the dough to a smooth and “slightly sticky” consistency, I had to add at least an extra half cup of flour to the dough. It also took me a LONG time to understand the shaping instructions (the recipe said to roll the dough like a “jelly roll” and I didn’t know what that meant) – but that is on me, not the recipe.

This recipe was the most challenging one I have tried so far, and also the most delicious! The scallion pancakes are perfect when they are hot off the pan! And the tanginess of the carrot slaw nicely complements the scallion-and-sesame-filled pancakes. I will probably remake this recipe again at some point.

Technical notes:

  • The carrot slaw recipe calls for minced fresh ginger. This was the first time that I used fresh ginger (as opposed to powdered) and it makes a world of difference!
  • The pancake dough recipe as it is listed in the recipe just doesn’t seem right – I ended up requiring at least an extra half cup of flour to get it to a “smooth and slightly sticky” consistency.
  • The pancake dough will seem too salty if you taste it before frying your pancakes. But once the pancakes are fried, they are perfect. Somehow the too-salty taste goes away once they’re in their final form.
  • It is okay if some oil/scallion filling spills out of your pancake. You can sprinkle a bit of flour over it.
  • These pancakes are best when they are fresh off the pan. If you are going to re-heat them, do so over the stove (they don’t microwave well).

Year of Yeh #2: Basic Challah

This weekend, I tackled another recipe from Molly on the Range…with help from my husband, who is an excellent bread baker! There were several bread recipes (especially challah recipes) in Molly on the Range to choose from, but we decided to start with basic challah.

The recipe: Basic Challah
Difficulty: Easy
Time: 3+ hours (but much of that time is hands-off)

This challah was the perfect lazy weekend bake. It was slightly time-consuming to make, but much of the prep time was hands-off, leading to lots of down time while the dough rose. This challah was also a lot of fun to bake with a partner. My husband and I split the dough into two balls, and each braided a challah simultaneously.

On the subject of braiding the challah: that was the most challenging part of this recipe. My husband made a 5-stranded braid, and I made a 4-stranded one, but we both found that our braids were a bit loose on one end (the end where we started the braid) and tighter on the other end. Luckily, the second rise (and the third rise, or the bake) allows the dough to expand and correct any looseness.

Husband’s 5-stranded challah on the left; my 4-stranded challah on the right.

All in all, this recipe took us over 3 hours…and it was so worth it! This challah recipe is honestly perfect. The bread is soft and airy, with a smooth golden crust. Because the challah uses an enriched dough, the bread is rich and just slightly sweet, making it one of the few breads that is enjoyable on its own. But it is also excellent with butter, jam, fresh fruit, or probably anything else you want to put on it.

Sliced challah with butter and passionfruit.

Technical notes:

  • You will need a VERY LARGE bowl if you follow the recipe as it listed in the Molly on the Range cookbook (it calls for 6.5 cups of flour, as opposed to 3.5 in the scaled-down version on KAF)
  • If you have a kitchen scale, weight out your dough so that your braid strands are roughly the same size. This will make the braiding easier.
  • DON’T flour your work surface before you roll out the strands! It’s easier to elongate your dough strands if they are not coated in flour (I learned the hard way).

Year of Yeh #1: Spaghetti & Meatless Balls

This is my first “Year of Yeh” post, wherein I document the process of making recipes from Molly Yeh’s cookbook Molly on the Range. A couple nights ago, I kicked off the project by making her “Spaghetti & My Ex-Boyfriend’s Meatless Balls” recipe. The recipe utilizes spaghetti and marinara sauce as a vehicle for vegetarian meatballs.

Recipe: Spaghetti & My Ex-Boyfriend’s Meatless Balls
Difficulty level: easy if you have a food processor
Total time: ~30-45 minutes (longer if you make sauce from scratch)

The cooked meatless balls.

I had a great time making this recipe! The meatless balls are pretty straightforward as long as you have a food processor. All you have to do is: measure out your ingredients, pulse them all together in a food processor, roll the mixture into balls, and then fry them. The frying was the most challenging part of the process. For one thing, hot flying oil particles are scary! But it was also challenging to get each meatball perfectly browned on every side. Many of the meatballs I cooked had a semi-burnt spot.

The meatless balls are the star of this recipe – author Molly Yeh says so herself in the book. But she recommends serving them with spaghetti and marinara sauce, as this is one of her favorite ways to enjoy the meatless balls. I mostly followed her recommendation: I served the meatless balls over spaghetti with tomato-garlic-pesto sauce (I wanted to use up leftover basil in the fridge).

So how did the meatless balls taste? Really good! The predominant flavors were parmesan cheese and toasted almond, with pleasant seasoning from the garlic, pepper, and parsley. Smothered in sauce, these meatless balls might pass as turkey balls. On their own, they don’t really taste like meat…but they don’t need to. With their savory, slightly nutty flavor, these meatless balls absolutely hold their own.

Meatless balls served over spaghetti; topped with tomato-garlic-pesto, parmesan cheese, and basil.

Technical notes:

  • The recipe calls for toasted almonds. If you can’t buy toasted almonds, it is absolutely worth your time to toast your own almonds (just bake in the oven for 3-4 minutes at 350 F). Toasting the almonds changes/improves their flavor so much!
  • If you don’t have dried parsley, dried basil or oregano will work well too.
  • I didn’t think the meatballs needed to be fried in 1/4″ oil – just enough oil to perfectly coat the pan worked pretty well for me.
  • Marinara sauce seems like the perfect sauce for these meatless balls (I served with tomato-garlic-pesto, which was good, but marinara sauce would be better).

2019 reading review & 2020 goals

Now is the time of year when everybody is posting their 2019 reading stats, and goals for 2020. So I am going to hop on that bandwagon and do the same! I’m keeping things simple, and combining my 2019 review and 2020 goals into a single post.

Booking and blogging in 2019:

I read 34 books in 2019. Compared to many of the book-bloggers that I follow, this number is laughably low. But 2019 was my first year of reading as a hobby; prior to 2019 I never read consistently throughout any calendar year. So while the number is low compared to others’, this is definitely a personal success for me.

I baked things for 30 of the 34 books I read this year. If you follow my blog, you probably know that it started off as a dual baking/reading project, where I baked something inspired by every book that I read. Toward the end of the year, I was unable to keep up with my goal to bake something for every book. Still, 30 bakes is a lot! I became a much better baker this year; and also strengthened connections with coworkers, neighbors, and friends by regularly sharing baked goods with them.

My favorite three books that I read this year were:

2020 goals:

Read at least 45 books. Last year I read 34 books (average: ~3 per month). I would love to read even more this year! With one of my New Year’s resolutions being to limit to weeknight TV time, I think I can accomplish 45.

Read every book longlisted for the 2020 Women’s Prize for Fiction. By following amazing book-bloggers on wordpress, I learned about the Women’s Prize for Fiction, and read 6 of the 16 longlisted books. Some of these books I probably wouldn’t have read had it not been for the Women’s Prize, but I really enjoyed them: four of those books were 5-star reads for me, and one of them (Lost Children Archive) ended up being my favorite book of the year. So this year I’d like to broaden my horizons even more, and read more excellent woman-authored fiction!

Read at least two classics. In 2019, all the books I read were contemporary, with the “oldest” one being published in 2008. This makes sense, because there is always so much great new material being published. But this year I would like to at least slightly diversify by reading a couple of excellent older books.

Changes to the blog in 2020:

I will no longer be doing a bake for every book that I read. As I mentioned above, it has become too hard to keep up with this project. My bakes (and therefore my blog posts) are now over a month behind my reading, and this gap will likely continue to widen. Instead, I will post standalone book reviews, participate in blogging events, and pursue a different cooking/baking project…

I am starting a project for 2020 called “Year of Yeh.” This project is essentially Julie & Julia, but using Molly Yeh’s cookbook Molly on the Range. I recently received several cookbooks as gifts, and I want to start using them! So this year, I plan to cook and bake my way through Molly on the Range. I specifically chose this cookbook for two reasons. First, I have baked a few things from Yeh’s online blog and I really enjoy her recipes (including tahini milkshakes, coffee-cardamom cake, and fresh mint cake). And second, her cookbook contains a nice mix of main dishes, side dishes, and desserts – so I will get to try and learn many new things.