Nonfiction November 2019: week 2

This week’s Nonfiction November prompt is fiction/non-fiction book pairings. To quote the creator of this challenge: “It can be a ‘If you loved this book, read this!’ or just two titles that you think would go well together. Maybe it’s a historical novel and you’d like to get the real history by reading a nonfiction version of the story.”

I was nervous about this prompt – mostly because I am not confident in giving recommendations to others – but I ended up having a lot of fun with it! Here are the pairings/groupings that I came up with:

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone, Queenie, and Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine.

I grouped these together because they all emphasize the potential of therapy. Maybe You Should Talk to Someone is a non-fiction book that looks at an actual therapist’s experience helping patients (and going to therapy herself), and shows how therapy helped both her and her patients. Queenie and Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine are fiction books, and both include the title characters going to therapy to process trauma. If you read and liked either Queenie or Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine, my guess is that you would also like Maybe You Should Talk to Someone.

nîtisânak and On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous

These books go well together because they are both beautifully and poetically written; and they both show difficult relationships through a very compassionate lens. nîtisânak is a memoir by poet Lindsay Nixon, who writes about the struggles of being queer and native Canadian. On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous is a fictional novel (but based in part upon author Ocean Vuong’s lived experiences) that explores a first-generation American son’s complex relationship with his mother. Both are meant to be slow, thoughtful reads, and both discuss difficult relationships and “taboo topics” from a place of immense compassion. Also, they are both so beautifully written – they would make a lovely pairing.

That’s all I have for this prompt! If you have any fiction/non-fiction book pairings, I would love to hear them!

Month in review: July 2019

Every month, I find myself writing “this past month has been crazy” – or something to that effect. Well…July was no exception! This month consisted of a 6-hour road trip to Pennsylvania, lots of wedding-planning activities, and a cross-country visit to California. Also, my fiancé and I adopted two cats! They are amazing and adorable and enrich our lives, but adjusting to life with them has certainly contributed to my “busy” feeling. The month also consisted of lots of reading (mostly because I spend virtually all of my commute-time reading now).

Books read:

One of my friends used to joke with me that I don’t have “distinguishing tastes” when it comes to food…but based on this month’s book ratings, that may be true of books too! Or perhaps I just got lucky enough to genuinely love all the books that I read this past month. Something interesting about this month of reading is that three of the four books I read focused heavily on mental health. The Hate U Give was focused more on racism and police violence, but it still touches on mental health (although not explicitly), as the main character of the novel experiences trauma-induced anxiety. I love that mainstream media is portraying mental health issues in a normalizing and empathetic way.

Bakes:

While I did a lot of reading this month, I’ve lagged significantly on baking: I only completed bakes for two of the four books I read. For The Hate U Give, I baked red velvet cheesecake brownies inspired by Mrs. Rooks’ famous red velvet cake. For Queenie, I baked a vanilla bundt cake glazed with guava syrup. Bakes for Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine and Maybe You Should Talk To Someone are coming soon!

Books in progress/goals for August:

I’m currently reading On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous by Ocean Vuong and – WOW – it already lives up to its hype. I also plan to read Confessions of the Fox by Jordy Rosenberg, as well as a non-fiction book called The Truffle Underground (which is about truffle mushrooms). I also might check out some of the books that made the Booker Prize Longlist (although I’m pretty turned off by the fact that On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous didn’t make the list).

Blog posts I enjoyed…

I have to confess something: I have NOT been a good member of the blogging community this month. I read and responded to some bloggers’ posts this month, but I didn’t engage as meaningfully with other bloggers as I would have liked. I frequently skimmed other bloggers posts, reading and commenting on posts superficially rather than mindfully. I strive to do better in August.

Some photos from July:

Queenie (plus, a bundt cake fit for a queen)

The book: Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams.

A couple weeks ago, I read Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams. The title character, Queenie, has just separated from her boyfriend of two years, and now must make sense of her life without him. Between her job at a national newspaper in London, some tense familial relationships, and several post-breakup rebounds, Queenie is flailing and struggling to figure out who she is (in a society that will so readily tell her exactly who they think she is).

Queenie was a refreshingly slow read, and by slow, I’m referring to the pace of the plot. The novel wasn’t exactly action-packed or overly dramatic, and I think that was the point. Rather than focusing on distracting action and external drama, Queenie spends most of the book focused on internal issues. I found this refreshing because, in an age of near-constant distraction, a novel stressing the importance of slowing down and focusing on yourself (and not just through capitalistic “self-care” rituals like face-masks) seems necessary. I love the message that prioritizing mental health is a story worth telling.

Between Queenie, The Pisces, and the TV show Crazy Ex-Girlfriend (both of which I have written about on this blog before), the topic of internal issues leading to problematic romantic relationships is almost (but not quite) starting to feel like a cliched trope. The topic isn’t cliched though: novels that show characters responsibly addressing their anxieties and traumas are important because they set a positive example for their readers, who may also be suffering from anxieties and traumas.

In addition to addressing mental health, Queenie also takes on sexism and racism. Throughout the novel Queenie is fetishized and objectified by white men, and there is also a scene where she goes on a date with someone who turns out to be a white supremacist. Both scenes demonstrate that sexism and racism are still pertinent issues in today’s society, and that they are intersectional.

Overall, I really enjoyed Queenie. The writing style is easy to follow, and the plot is interesting despite being a bit slow-paced. The novel addresses many topics that are relevant today – including mental health, sexism, and racism – in a really effective and compelling way. Also, many readers will probably identify with Queenie to some degree, because the experience of simply trying to find yourself in your early 20’s is so relatable.

The bake: vanilla guava bundt cake.

For Queenie, I wanted to bake something simple and elegant, that would also pay tribute to Queenie’s British-Jamaican heritage. These considerations all came together in the form of a vanilla guava bundt cake: the shape of the bundt pan makes the cake look elegant, the sponge base of the cake pays tribute to Queenie’s British nationality, and the guava flavor pays tribute to her Jamaican heritage (my friend from Jamaica told me that guava-based desserts are common there).

To make this elegant, British-Jamaican-inspired dessert, I baked this simple vanilla bundt cake from Delish (with one modification: I used vanilla oat milk instead of whole milk, in hopes of giving the cake extra vanilla flavor). I topped it with a guava glaze, which I just made by boiling sugar and guava juice into a simple syrup.

This is a very nice cake! My bundt pan has a sort of non-traditional shape, which makes the cake look elegant, and more complex than it actually is. The cake recipe is also really good, and baking it in a bundt pan makes the final cake slightly crisp on the outside while soft on the inside. The only downside to this cake was that the guava flavor wasn’t very strong; if I were to try this again, I’d probably soak the entire cake in guava syrup instead of just making an outer glaze. But that being said, this cake was still delicious.